Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?
One thing you said that I didn’t know was that if you mix oils the compounds and effects can change based on the orders of mixing. I haven’t seen that anywhere so if you have a link to that info, I’d love to see it. And as far as the article I mention… I’m not sure which one you’re referring to. Just let me know though, and I’ll try to direct you to it.
Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
Leslie wants to create an energizing essential oil blend for herself. She plans on diffusing it during her morning shower, and her goal is to feel more awake, energized, and uplifted. She wants her essential oil blend to be a combination of aromatic blending (blended primarily for fragrance) and therapeutic blending (blended primarily for an emotional or physical effect).
I found you while searching for information about essential oils. You have a really neat site and with tons of great and valuable information that helps me a lot. I have been using essential oils for some time now, specially for cleaning around my home and for room sprays . I am now making soy candles but I am using essential oils instead of fragrance oils, even though some says that essential oils doesn’t have a very good scent throw in candles. My question for you is, Can I use jasmine absolute in jojoba oil for scent my wax? And what will be the ratio for blending in 6oz of soy wax? Would the 30-50-20 rule apply the same for blending essential oils for candles?

Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!


ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.
I know I’ve said it quite a few times already, but when it comes to blending essential oils there is no “one right way” to do it. The same is true when it comes to essential oil blending ratios. Like most essential oil blending concepts, it comes down to what you like. With that said, I’m going to share a few of the simplest blending ratios I’ve personally used to help give you a place to start.
Any idea’s on blends for autism? CBD oil I think is going to change everything, it’s taken away 95% of my autism symptoms and I’m going in public now. Also off all 5 synthetic prescription and testing different blends with frankencense, vanilla, lavendar, and peppermint I got. I like those but I would like some woody smells. I’m not sure, I just can’t afford to keep buying a new bottle at a time for $10.
When you smell a scent or an aroma, the smell hits the limbic system of your brain, which controls your memories and emotions. So that freshly-baked cookie probably makes you feel good about the times you baked cookies with grandma when you were little. Isn’t that amazing? Read on to find out the awesome benefits of aromatherapy as well as 30 wonderful essential oil diffuser recipes!
so many other benefits of essential oils – Depending on the specific essential oils used, the diffuser blend can also help improve focus, give me an energy boost, calm me down and help me relax when I’m feeling stressed, clean & purify the air in my home, help my get a great night’s sleep, and more.  I’ve tried to point out some of these essential oils benefits in the descriptions of the fall diffuser blends below.
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
It said that the reason companies like Young Living and doTERRA are so expensive is because they claim their oils can be used internally, and that means they must carry insurance in case they’re sued based on those claims… which makes their oils more expensive. Smaller companies usually can’t afford that type of insurance so they can’t make those claims about internal use, but it does mean that their oils can be priced cheaper even though the quality is the same as the bigger companies.
Someone may have mentioned this already, but if a company makes certain claims about how their product should be used (i.e. reduces inflammation, relieves stress, heals wounds, etc.), they are required to label their product as a drug under FDA laws. Any product that is declared as a drug must include additional information on their labeling and are subject to other regulations regarding drugs. Companies that declare their EOs are therapeutic are also responsible for supporting the therapeutic or medicine claims made on their labels. Most companies, however, do not claim their EOs are therapeutic or medicinal is because they do not want to have the extra oversight and responsibility that comes with such a claim. There are other specific things they avoid putting on their labels and additional cautions made to ensure their EOs are not considered medicinal, even if their oils are the same content and grades as other “therapeutic” oils on the market.
To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.
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