Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
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You’ll also want to go back through your list and evaluate your essential oils for safety. The safety of an essential oil will largely be determined based on how it is used (inhalation, topical, internal), and this can be a complex topic that will require more research on your part. Most essential oil suppliers will have safety information in their product descriptions so this can be a good place to look as can other websites and books dedicated to essential oil safety.

I just happened upon your site and I really like it. Everything is researched and well written. I’m saving this to come back again 🙂 I totally agree with you on cost not necessarily reflecting the quality of oil. While I agree that a low cost essential oil will usually indicate an adulteration, there are many smaller companies that have pure essential oils with reasonable prices.
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.
Someone may have mentioned this already, but if a company makes certain claims about how their product should be used (i.e. reduces inflammation, relieves stress, heals wounds, etc.), they are required to label their product as a drug under FDA laws. Any product that is declared as a drug must include additional information on their labeling and are subject to other regulations regarding drugs. Companies that declare their EOs are therapeutic are also responsible for supporting the therapeutic or medicine claims made on their labels. Most companies, however, do not claim their EOs are therapeutic or medicinal is because they do not want to have the extra oversight and responsibility that comes with such a claim. There are other specific things they avoid putting on their labels and additional cautions made to ensure their EOs are not considered medicinal, even if their oils are the same content and grades as other “therapeutic” oils on the market.
the scents bring back memories and make me feel good — I LOVE fall!  And I love fall diffuser blends!  The changing colors of the leaves, sweater weather, fireplace nights with a bowl of popcorn and a movie, a breath of crisp air, cuddling up with a good book, Thanksgiving dinner, pumpkin carving, wearing scarves again, baking cookies & pies, apple picking, jumping in leaves, roasting marshmallows, crisp hikes, making stews and chili, Eskimo kisses to warm the nose, chimney smoke, hot apple cider, being wrapped in cozy blankets, hay rides, farmers’ markets, and cinnamon everything.  Filling my home with these fall diffuser blends, evokes warm memories and makes me feel good.
Hi, Dorothy. Great question, and this may be something you’ll want to run by an aromatherapist as they have more training in how EOs are made. But, from my understanding, whether the essential oil is extracted via steam (water), alcohol, or CO2… none of that comes through in the final product. As in, you don’t actually have water or alcohol or CO2 in the final essential oil. So, when you’re blending, you’re actually blending oil with oil regardless of the extraction process and emulsifiers aren’t needed. Now, I could be totally wrong there. Again, you’ll need to ask someone more knowledgeable in that area. Hope this helps.
Glad to hear you’re finding the info helpful. I’ve never heard of the Majestic Pure brand before so I can’t comment on how strong it is. I always look for EOs from brands I know and trust that are high-quality, pure oils. If you can’t smell your blend well once it’s added to your alcohol, it could be that your dilution rate is off. I’m not sure. If you’re looking for a good company with a lot of oil choices, be sure to check out Edens Garden essential oils. They offer pure EOs, and they carry a ton of scents!
Just because these two brands frequently recommend taking essential oils internally doesn’t mean their brands can be and others can’t. It just means they give unsafe advice that is contrary to what any real aromatherapist would advise. People have gotten seriously hurt by following this advice. The International Association of Holistic Aromatherapist says that essential oils should never be taken internally unless you are advised to do so by a clinical aromatherapist who has appropriate training in anatomy, physiology, chemistry, etc. This has nothing to do with oil purity and everything to do with the fact that essential oils are very powerful.

As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Neither Rocky Mountain Oils nor its products are intended for the purpose of diagnosing, treating, curing, or preventing any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using these products.
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