Most commonly, essential oils are used in an essential diffuser together with water. Aromatherapy works quite well over our olfactory system (=sense of smell) as many emotions can be triggered by certain cents alone. While there are other ways to use essential oils, diffuser blending is a fun art and hobby on its own that many essential oil enthusiasts enjoy.

Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).
Someone may have mentioned this already, but if a company makes certain claims about how their product should be used (i.e. reduces inflammation, relieves stress, heals wounds, etc.), they are required to label their product as a drug under FDA laws. Any product that is declared as a drug must include additional information on their labeling and are subject to other regulations regarding drugs. Companies that declare their EOs are therapeutic are also responsible for supporting the therapeutic or medicine claims made on their labels. Most companies, however, do not claim their EOs are therapeutic or medicinal is because they do not want to have the extra oversight and responsibility that comes with such a claim. There are other specific things they avoid putting on their labels and additional cautions made to ensure their EOs are not considered medicinal, even if their oils are the same content and grades as other “therapeutic” oils on the market.
You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.
Most commonly, essential oils are used in an essential diffuser together with water. Aromatherapy works quite well over our olfactory system (=sense of smell) as many emotions can be triggered by certain cents alone. While there are other ways to use essential oils, diffuser blending is a fun art and hobby on its own that many essential oil enthusiasts enjoy.

Oils can also be dropped onto your pillow to promote better sleep, or they can be added to water in a spray bottle and misted onto blankets, area rugs, curtains, and household surfaces. The meditative practice of steam inhalation can also be beneficial in eliminating anxiety; simply add a few drops of your favorite blend to a bowl of hot water, hold your face over the bowl, and drape a moistened cloth over the back of your head. Breathe in and out steadily and slowly.


I posted a reply comment regarding the price of essential oils stating that in most cases you do get what you pay for but some companies are overpriced. This was obviously a comment that you did not want read and felt threatened by the content. Obviously your philosophy is based financially and not in the best interest of what is good for the consumer. Shame on you!
The shift for me was that I wanted all members to feel they have a say in the development of the software. Showing ads means that advertisers would be the customers, and that doesn't feel right. Ads would take up valuable space on the screen. And ads would distract from the goal of providing you with a simple, streamlined interface to discover new ways to use your essential oils.
thank you for your facts. I have a friend who only uses doterra..and she takes some internally. She is in school for herbology and thinks she knows everything about EO’s, and tells me how Doterra is the only one that sells “theropudic grade” EO and they sell all thats is out there. But i already researched that web site and saw that they did not sell ALL. Because I have done my research(google)lol, and now I have books by several reputable practitioners/authors[Lawless,Worwood,Grady]. I have told her that she is being mis informed about her EO usage and needs to be more cautious. But her response is always; oh dont worry..we are of mother earth..my family has been doing this for decades.(her family are descendents of an Indian culture, as is most of us..lol) so i will be fine, she says. well this is the generation of the hard headed(she is only 22, I be 47 so imma leave her to od on EO i guess..lol)

Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
If it were me EYG, I’d Google “safe essential oils for dogs” and get a list to go by. Then I’d Google “bug repelling essential oils” and compare the two lists. Cross off any EOs on the bug repellant list that aren’t safe for dogs. Next, I’d put the oils you have left into their notes and categories and try to find 3-4 bug repelling oils that can be paired together and still smell nice and well-rounded. You can combine these EOs together using the percentage rule mentioned in the post and label it with “bug repellant EOs for dog”. When you’re ready to use it, mix it into your carrier oil at the appropriate dilution and you should be good to go. Hope that helps!

Someone may have mentioned this already, but if a company makes certain claims about how their product should be used (i.e. reduces inflammation, relieves stress, heals wounds, etc.), they are required to label their product as a drug under FDA laws. Any product that is declared as a drug must include additional information on their labeling and are subject to other regulations regarding drugs. Companies that declare their EOs are therapeutic are also responsible for supporting the therapeutic or medicine claims made on their labels. Most companies, however, do not claim their EOs are therapeutic or medicinal is because they do not want to have the extra oversight and responsibility that comes with such a claim. There are other specific things they avoid putting on their labels and additional cautions made to ensure their EOs are not considered medicinal, even if their oils are the same content and grades as other “therapeutic” oils on the market.

I made a sugar scrub for the first time this holiday and the scents are “off”. Could it be because I used too much oil? It is not pleasant at all. I know the oils are good quality. The peppermint does not smell refreshing at all nor does the lavender. I am guessing I used too many drops. Can I dilute by doubling the sugar and coconut oil? Any recommendations so I can save the 5 cups I have so far?
A stroll through the orchard picking apples is the perfect way to spend a fall afternoon.  When a fall breeze blows through the trees at the orchard near us, it smells very much like this diffuser blend – woody, a little sweet, with a hint of fresh fir from the Christmas tree farm next door.  It’s relaxing and grounding- a great fall diffuser blend to help lessen anxious feelings.
Wonderful blog site! I just jumped into this EO stuff this week, with little forethought. I wanted some natural bug repellent solutions for my dogs and my family. Next thing I know, I have ordered lots of ingredients and am finding myself getting to get into this. My husband said if I start stirring a big black couldron and cackling, he will start worrying. Lol. I told him Eye of Newt doesn’t seem to be available in an EO, so not to worry.
acne analgesic anti-infectious anti-inflammatory antibacterial antidepressant antifungal antiseptic antispasmodic antiviral anxiety aphrodisiac arthritis asthma bronchitis burns circulation colds constipation cough coughs cystitis depression diuretic expectorant fatigue flu gas gout headaches herpes indigestion insomnia lung congestion migraines nausea nervousness rheumatism sedative shingles sinus sore throat stress tension wounds
If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!
There seems to be new essential oil companies popping up every day, but I’ve used doTERRA essential oils for nearly 4 years and I’ll never go anywhere else. The oils are third-party tested for purity (you can SMELL the difference if you compare them to other brands), ethically sourced around the globe, and I love that doTERRA is a humanitarian-geared company. Hearing stories like this of a Wellness Advocate who is working hard to help Ebola-ravaged areas of Africa makes me so proud to be associated with this company. I’m happy to personally help you get these oils in your home and tell you more about why I chose doTERRA-– click here to connect with me. 
It said that the reason companies like Young Living and doTERRA are so expensive is because they claim their oils can be used internally, and that means they must carry insurance in case they’re sued based on those claims… which makes their oils more expensive. Smaller companies usually can’t afford that type of insurance so they can’t make those claims about internal use, but it does mean that their oils can be priced cheaper even though the quality is the same as the bigger companies.
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!

As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
I make my own essential oils and I know of several ways to extract oils from plants of various types. but my favorite for making essential oils is a steam extraction method. I don’t lose as much of the essential oils and its 100% pure when I’m finished with the process that is until I add it to carrier oils such as Extra Virgin Olive Oil and organic grape seed oil. I sell both my essential oils as well as the deluded oils and I don’t charge no $30.00 per oz but I don’t make sandalwood oils I only make oils from the flowers herbs fruits and veggies I can grow in my own backyard but I still don’t charge as much as those bigger companies that doesn’t mean my oils are any less pure than theirs.
But she is my sister, so I gave the oils a try.  I put 3-5 drops of lavender essential oil in a diffuser by my bed.  Turned the diffuser on.  Climbed into bed and drifted off to sleep.  Next thing I knew my alarm was going off.  I had slept straight through the night for a full 8 hours!!  “But how could this be?”, I thought.  It must have been a fluke.  Maybe I was just so exhausted from the day before and that’s why I didn’t wake up?
Okay, so I am clearly late to the game on this post, but I am so glad I found it! Jill, I have been researching essential oils, diffusers, oil blends, etc. – and my gosh!, there is a lot of information out there. It is overwhelming. Thank you for this very helpful, easy to follow post on using essential oils in a diffuser. I signed up to receive your emails and got your book for FREE. Thank you! My family of four has been so sick this past month. My friends keep telling me that I need to be using essential oils. Your blog is fantastic. I know I will be coming back to visit often. Blessings, Jana
No that was my question! I was worried those smells wouldn’t blend properly (Lavender as the primary + rosemary with a touch of oak moss which i know will be hard with oak moss absolute as being thick!-I’ve been warned thicker than vetiver!) and the idea of the dried herbs(rosemary and lavender) in jasmine rice together… would I get lucky on any advice for mixing those oils with a general ratio in mind or if my OG idea of drop count sounded possibly safe?
When it comes to blending essential oils for aromatic purposes (that means you’re blending based on scent rather than a therapeutic action), it’s important to make sure you find essential oil combinations that go together or attract so they smell nice once they’re blended together. I personally find this to be important when blending essential oils for therapeutic purposes as well, but that’s just a personal preference.  
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