How to Use? The 10 ml bottle is compact enough to take with you anywhere made of dark amber glass with euro style dropper and tamper-proof seal cap. The euro dropper will allow you to control oil dispensing for easy oil dropping. To get flow slower from orifice reducers, tip the bottle slowly and rotate the bottle so the air hole is on the bottom or side as this will help create a vacuum that will allow the essential oil to flow slower.
Kick off your holiday shopping with the new 2019 doTERRA Holiday products. Find something for everyone on your list, and maybe snag a few gifts for yourself. From oil-infused teas to a beautiful new hand wash, you are sure to find something extra special to brighten the season. Browse the holiday guide and be first in line to get the Brevi® Stone Diffuser, handcrafted dryer balls, or doTERRA Touch® Trio.

Relieve Tension & Calms Mind: The essential oil won't just be an anxiety reliever but will also help you in relieving pressure and tension. When inhaled, it invigorates and provides uplifting as well as stabilizing effects on emotions to calm both mind as well as body naturally. Anxiety Relief inspires rational and logical thinking when dealing with adverse circumstances.
A simple way to enjoy the sedative properties of essential oils is to directly inhale the aroma from the bottle. Hold the bottle 1-2 inches away from your nose and take several deep breaths.  It’s recommended that you use a nebulizing diffuser for direct oil inhalation, but do not inhale the vapours directly, as these vapours can be very concentrated.
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
Hi Zeyad, I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking in your first question. Are you wanting to know how much of the essential oil you add to the alcohol? It would depend on what you’re using this blend for and at what strength you want it. As far as how to get it to stay on your clothes for a long time, that too will depend on the blend and the strength. Make sure you’re using each of the three notes in your blend. Remember the base note oil is the one that will linger the longest. Also, the dilution percentage will matter. The stronger the dilution, the more it will smell. For example a 1% dilution won’t smell as strong as a 3% dilution will. Hope that helps more!
Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
I don’t care about money, I do want to get off disability though now that I have 16 hours of free time a day and am not stuck in a bed taking pills all day. I want quality though, and to be happy with everything regardless if I ever sold it, I want to give it away for free! I want to grow CBD and give it away. All of this can heal the entire World, that’s why they removed certain things and put synthetics with patents, never even asking us about our diet or exercise, they never cared. I’ve been marketed to my entire life for medicine I’m going to give it all away I think. Or earn the money and then donate it. I just don’t like money, it’s dangerous.
This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.
Essential oils. If you already own a set of essential oils that work with my recipes below, great! If you’re shopping for oils, have a look at the Top 10 best essential oil brands, and select a company you like to buy your oils from. If you want a really easy way to get started, build your own set of 6 essential oils at Edens Garden, and you’ll be able to make all of my recipes when your kit comes in the mail!
It’s worth it to have a high quality diffuser to diffuse essential oils. This Smiley Daisy Essential Oil Diffuser, Quite Cool Mist Humidifier, 350 ml has been around for a long while and has great reviews. Smiley Daisy is a cold air diffuser, as well as a humidifier, which is great because it releases moisture into the air and is helpful in providing relief for dry skin, dry throat and cold and flu symptoms such as irritated nasal passages and more. Order below:
For depression: Depression and sleep problems often go hand in hand. A number of studies have examined the effects of aromatherapy using essential oils in people with depression and depressive symptoms, both with and without anxiety. Aromatherapy can help improve depressive symptoms, according to the results of several studies. A study found aromatherapy improved both depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women. And a 2016 analysis found aromatherapy effective in reducing stress and depression—as well as symptoms of menopause—in middle-aged women.
The method of inhaling essential oils is one of the most readily proven ways to alleviate stress and anxiety, ward off symptoms depression, find restful sleep, clear the mind, and stimulate the senses. The effects of essential oils rely on the connection between the olfactory and limbic systems; signals travel through the nose to the part of the brain that controls emotional responses such as the emotions that trigger stress responses.

Hi Zeyad, I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking in your first question. Are you wanting to know how much of the essential oil you add to the alcohol? It would depend on what you’re using this blend for and at what strength you want it. As far as how to get it to stay on your clothes for a long time, that too will depend on the blend and the strength. Make sure you’re using each of the three notes in your blend. Remember the base note oil is the one that will linger the longest. Also, the dilution percentage will matter. The stronger the dilution, the more it will smell. For example a 1% dilution won’t smell as strong as a 3% dilution will. Hope that helps more!


Once you have your essential oils categorized, it’s time to see which oils will possibly combine well with each other. And, just as categorizing essential oils is subjective, so is combining categories. Ultimately, there are no absolutes when it comes to blending essential oils. That’s the art of essential oil blending! It’s totally based on your preferences and how the oil smells to you. Now with that being said, there are a couple of guidelines that are good for beginners to follow.

Hi, Kelly. The opt-in form is at the very bottom of the post, above the references and author info. If you still don’t see it, it could be a technical issues, and I can sign you up manually with your permission. Just let me know. Update: Hey, Kelly. I’m showing that you’ve been added to the list so you should receive your download link soon. Sorry for the trouble!
It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
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A simple way to enjoy the sedative properties of essential oils is to directly inhale the aroma from the bottle. Hold the bottle 1-2 inches away from your nose and take several deep breaths.  It’s recommended that you use a nebulizing diffuser for direct oil inhalation, but do not inhale the vapours directly, as these vapours can be very concentrated.

As a person who was pretty much born anxious, I’m always looking for something to take the edge off. Meditation, mental exercises, eliminating sugar from my diet, and yes, medication, have helped a lot, but I’ve started to dabble in aromatherapy too. Diffusing calming essential oils like lavender and clary sage helps me drift off to sleep at night when I used to lie in bed worrying—with the bonus of making the bedroom smell amazing.
In study of women who were pregnant for the first time published in the Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, one group of women was received a 10-minute inhalation and footbath with oil rose, another group received a 10-minute warm-water footbath, and they were compared to a control group. The findings showed “aromatherapy and footbath reduces anxiety in active phase in nulliparous women.” (6)
Hi Kristi! I wouldn’t necessarily run all at the same time with different blends as it could just be too much for your sense of smell, unless they are in different rooms and you won’t notice the scent from another room. I do have one in my bedroom and another in my kitchen area and almost always have different blends in them, although usually they aren’t running simultaneously since I’m not in both of the rooms at the same time. I also have one in the kids room where I’ll run some soothing blends in there for a little while before they go to sleep 🙂
The slight grassiness of the basil blends well with the fresh, citrusy notes of grapefruit and orange to evoke feelings of freshly raked leaves on a sunny fall day.  I can’t think of a better way to start an autumn day than with diffusing this blend of grapefruit, orange, and basil.  Since it’s both uplifting and energizing, it’s a great way to start the morning off on the right foot.
I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
One of my favorite kinds of cookies as a young girl was snickerdoodles.  I just loved helping my mom by flattening out the balls of cookie dough with the bottom of a glass and then watching the cookies expand in the oven.  The characteristic cracking of the cinnamon sugar coating was so fun to watch happen.  This snickerdoodle diffuser blends bring back those childhood memories with it’s sweet, cinnamon aroma.  It’s a great blend to diffuser when I’m feeling a little on edge, as it helps to put me in a good mood and helps me to feel less stressed.
Disclaimer: The information on Don’t Mess with Mama is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice. I am not a medical professional and the information contained on this blog should not be used to diagnose, treat or prevent any disease or health illness. Consult with a qualified health care professional before acting on any information presented here.

Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).
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