Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
Hi Zeyad, I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking in your first question. Are you wanting to know how much of the essential oil you add to the alcohol? It would depend on what you’re using this blend for and at what strength you want it. As far as how to get it to stay on your clothes for a long time, that too will depend on the blend and the strength. Make sure you’re using each of the three notes in your blend. Remember the base note oil is the one that will linger the longest. Also, the dilution percentage will matter. The stronger the dilution, the more it will smell. For example a 1% dilution won’t smell as strong as a 3% dilution will. Hope that helps more!
To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.
Hi Kristi! I wouldn’t necessarily run all at the same time with different blends as it could just be too much for your sense of smell, unless they are in different rooms and you won’t notice the scent from another room. I do have one in my bedroom and another in my kitchen area and almost always have different blends in them, although usually they aren’t running simultaneously since I’m not in both of the rooms at the same time. I also have one in the kids room where I’ll run some soothing blends in there for a little while before they go to sleep 🙂

I would start with about 5 drops of oil for your diffuser (for most) depending on room size and the strength of the oil… then can add more. 10 drops for a large room. So for a recipe with 3 different oils, I usually start with 1-2 drops of each and see how that goes. I can always turn it off and add more if I feel it can be stronger, and I’ll usually end up a little stronger in our main living space for example. In my room, I get away with closer to one drop of each oil since it’s a smaller room. Again you can always add more, but start small. 🙂
I believe your comment on this post about diffuser recipes said, “doTERRA oils are overpriced” or something along those lines. As someone who is deeply involved with doTERRA, knows what goes into doTERRA oils, has been to the fields where the plants are grown and met the farmers, and also compared doTERRA oils to a number of other brands, I wholeheartedly disagree with your comment. I believe doTERRA oils are an amazing value.
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.
Hi Jorge… I don’t know anything specifically about beard oil… I’m assuming you’re looking for a scent combination and that will vary from person to person. If you purchase the essential oils you listed above and try them out in different combinations like the post suggests, I’m sure you’ll come up with a blend you’ll love. As of right now, I don’t do individualized consultations. I’m so sorry, but best of luck!

I’ve learned a very important lesson recently. A friend who sells young living told me that I could put a few drops of lemon oil in my water, as well as orange and grapefruit. Dummy me didn’t research this. You know, “well she’s a friend and seems to know a lot about oils. I can trust what she says”. One night I couldn’t sleep well, even had my lavender in my diffuser. I kept wondering “what the hheeeecckkk”. Prayed a bit, and then listened and read up on grapefruit oil. Wellllll that was my first lesson DO NOT TAKE OILS INTERNALLY and grapefruit oil is an energizer.
Thank you for this lovely list of essential oil recipes. I have used essential oils for a long time, but never quite figured out how to blend them for calming and physiological benefits. However, I must say, your impressive recipes appear to be right on the money. The first one I’ll try is the “Deep Breath,” I believe it’s exactly what I’ll love. Again, thank you..
You can definitely add essential oils to lotion bases. The ratio will depend on the essential oils in the mix and how much area of the body they will cover. This will definitely require more research and perhaps consulting from an aromatherapist. There are also a lot of great books out there that teach you how to use essential oils in skin care products that could offer more information as well. Hope this answers your question!
Yes, both are great for attention, but I’ll caution you about using rosemary on a child under 10 as that’s supposedly the minimum age to use it safely unless it’s really, really diluted. You can find more info about essential oil safety here. As for drop amounts, if it were me, lemon would be used most with a bit of rosemary. I’d do a 3% dilution so maybe 2 drops of lemon and 1 of rosemary for every 1 teaspoon of carrier oil you use… yes, it does need to be diluted in a carrier oil. ALL oils using on children, and most adults, should be diluted. It’s just too risky to not, and that helps spread them over the body more and have more surface are to absorb better. Hope that helps and gives you a start. If it doesn’t work as well as you’d like you can always adjust the oils or the dilution, but remember to keep it at a safe level.

A study used a blend of bergamot with lavender essential oils to help treat anxiety and depression. The blend was applied to the skin of the abdomen. Various different parameters were recorded – blood pressure, pulse rate, breathing rate and skin temperature. Participants were also required to rate their emotional condition in terms of relaxation, vigor, calmness, attentiveness, mood and alertness.
the scents bring back memories and make me feel good — I LOVE fall!  And I love fall diffuser blends!  The changing colors of the leaves, sweater weather, fireplace nights with a bowl of popcorn and a movie, a breath of crisp air, cuddling up with a good book, Thanksgiving dinner, pumpkin carving, wearing scarves again, baking cookies & pies, apple picking, jumping in leaves, roasting marshmallows, crisp hikes, making stews and chili, Eskimo kisses to warm the nose, chimney smoke, hot apple cider, being wrapped in cozy blankets, hay rides, farmers’ markets, and cinnamon everything.  Filling my home with these fall diffuser blends, evokes warm memories and makes me feel good.
I almost always give my kids baths in the evening (same goes for me) as a way to relax before bed so we use a lot of relaxing oils like lavender and chamomile or grounding oils like patchouli and vetiver. If I give them a bath in the middle of the day for some reason I’ll use more uplifting/energizing oils. Citrus oils mostly, but there are others that work great in those blends too like mint oils. Of course I’m always careful about safety precautions with EOs and using the correct ones with my kids. Best of luck with your bath melts. I’ve never tried those before so I’ll have to put that on my to-do list. They look wonderful!

Taking a long, hot bath at the end of a stress-filled day is a great way to decrease symptoms of anxiety and soothe your body. Soaking tired, fatigued muscles can ease tension, and the addition of essential oils creates a personalized spa experience. For a relaxing bath, simply add a few drops of any essential oil blend and breathe deeply while you soak.


LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
Essential oil blends can be directly inhaled from the bottle, or they can be added to a diffuser which allows their aroma to be dispersed throughout a greater area. Steam diffusers and reed diffusers are both excellent options. Additionally, there are several types of diffuser jewelry on the market, allowing you to take your favorite anxiety relieving aroma on the go.
Oh you’re so welcome!! I LOVE diffusing citrus oils, some of my favorites! I’ve never had an issue with our diffusers that way… but to clean them, fill it with half vinegar and half tap water and let it run a few hours. You can put it outside or in the garage or in a room you’re not using if you don’t like the scent 😉 Then in the morning or whenever you’re done, just wipe clean!! It keeps them running fresh! Hope that helps 😉

Once you have your essential oils categorized, it’s time to see which oils will possibly combine well with each other. And, just as categorizing essential oils is subjective, so is combining categories. Ultimately, there are no absolutes when it comes to blending essential oils. That’s the art of essential oil blending! It’s totally based on your preferences and how the oil smells to you. Now with that being said, there are a couple of guidelines that are good for beginners to follow.
×