During the day I use my Lampe Bergers…and buying their fuel has become an expense I feel is impractical. So, I’ve been trying to make some myself, using 91% isopropyl alcohol and a blend of essential oils. I really haven’t had any problems, other than the scents I’ve made are just not very strong. Could it be that my oils are not good enough for this purpose? I’ve done some testing of different brands by putting just a drop of oil onto a piece of paper and allowing it to dry. The Majestic Pure dries almost completely, without leaving much of a mark on the paper, while other brands dry leaving an oily mark. Is it possible that the Majestic Pure has alcohol in it?
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
While some of Organic Infusions essential oils are medical food grade, we do not advise the use of essential oils for internal use unless they are prescribed by your health care provider and certified aromatherapist. Only your health care provider and certified aromatherapist can prescribe the proper dosage and usage. Please check with your health care professional and certified aromatherapist before ingesting any essential oils.
I have used Organic Infusions oils for over 7 years now and I love them. They are the highest quality and vibration that I have found and their efforts for maintaining purity are remarkable! My favorite is the Rose Otto oil for daily skin use (I add 10 drops to a 2 oz bottle of my skincare cream and stir it in) and I also like using lemon and grapefruit daily in my diffuser and in my laundry, along with Lemongrass. I use daily in winter the blend Immune Protection and am rarely sick! A fabulous company with no monthly order requirements or stress that other companies require. I like to order when I order and that’s that! I am so happy to have found Organic Infusions and to benefit from these amazing oils! Thank you ever so much!!! ~ Teresa T.
Honestly Tori, I’m new to using roller bottles. I normally just put my essential oil blends in a bottle with a dropper top and use them that way, but I’ve recently gotten some roller bottles and started trying them out. My only thought would be that moisture got into the bottle somehow and it’s trapped in there by the roller ball. Other than that I’m no help. I’m so sorry!
hi meagan – thanks for your post – i have a lot to read and learn on mixing blends for essential oils – i am having so much trouble because i make CP soap – and so many essential oils can disappear during the saponification process – i have managed a couple of blends but they are masculine in perfume – i so want to find an easy blend of no more than 3 oils that will be feminine and for some reason conjure up the seep south and scarlett – i dont live anywhere near there or even in that country but i have a perfume in my head that i just cant for the life of me create. Is there any chance you could point me in the right direction???
If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!

From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.
I’ve never used it before, Joan, but I would imagine a little would go a long way and that it would be a great addition to muscle blends! I’d also guess it would fall into the “spicy” category of essential oils, and I would also decrease its total amount in any blend I made it in as it’s probably a very strong oil. I do use cayenne along with some other essential oils in the muscle rub blend that I make for my medicine cabinet. You can find that recipe in my How To Make Herbal Ointments, Salves, and Balms: The Ultimate How-To Guide if you’re interested.
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!
It said that the reason companies like Young Living and doTERRA are so expensive is because they claim their oils can be used internally, and that means they must carry insurance in case they’re sued based on those claims… which makes their oils more expensive. Smaller companies usually can’t afford that type of insurance so they can’t make those claims about internal use, but it does mean that their oils can be priced cheaper even though the quality is the same as the bigger companies.
I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂
This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.
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