*After becoming a Wholesale Member, the yearly renewal fee for a wholesale membership is $25.00. This renewal fee comes with a free bottle of Peppermint, one of the most popular oils doTERRA offers, a retail value of $27.33. If you would like to learn more about becoming a Wholesale Member or the benefits listed above, click here to tell us how to reach you. We are happy to contact you as soon as possible to answer any questions you may have.
Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Weird question- how can you switch from mix to mix in the same diffuser without having crossover? Is cleaning it out very complicated? And how to inhibit mold growth in the cold air diffuser- is it just a bonus that the EOs are anti bacterial/biotic/fungal or do you have to add some other ingredient? (I did read the article, I just didn’t see it, but it’s almost 1 am, so that may be why, lol)
“The quality of these essential oils are unlike any essential oils I have purchased. I used to buy my oils from various health stores and have bought big name brand oils. These are way better. The scents last longer on my skin and I get more for my money. I’m so happy. I’m hoping that for future needs I will only have to order from Biosource Naturals. I’m very happy with my purchase.”

I could be wrong, but I think Danika is confusing the term therapeutic grade with the “100% Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” that doTERRA coined and uses. Some oils are labeled for aromatherapy only, and others state they are therapeutic grade which I imagine is to indicate they are also for medicinal purposes. Not referring to ingestion, but topical applications.
From my understanding and research (and I’m not an aromatherapist), all essential oils have particular qualities of smell as far as which are smelled first and which last a short while vs. a long while. This is why you blend them together based on those qualities (which are categorized as “notes”) so you can smell each oil among the others and have your blend last longer. Do you have to follow that rule? Of course not. If you’re making blends that are going to smell great and last a good while, should you follow that rule? Probably… I don’t know for sure as I’m not an aromatherapist and I don’t make perfume blends often.
As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
This reason alone makes it important to choose the right diffuser and my advice to reap all of the benefits of essential oils is to stick with a cold-air, nebulizing or ultrasonic diffuser. I DO keep a little plugin diffuser in my car, although that one does heat up, so I know I’m getting the calming benefits of the scents, but I may be losing out on some of the other aromatherapy effects. 
Hi Rachael. Great questions! Those high dilution rates (20% and 10%) are just so you can smell your EO blend mixed with a carrier oil to see if you like it or not. All carrier oils smell different, and they can effect how your blend smells in the end. That’s why I recommend testing your EO blends in different carrier oils at different dilutions to see what you like best. And, because the smells of EO blends change depending on what they’re mixed with, it’s always a good idea to test them in small batches before making bigger batches (hence using drops and not teaspoons or ounces!). Once you know what you like, you can then move on to making larger amounts of preblended oils (EO blend + carrier oil) for skin application using a lower dilution rate (3-5% for adults and anywhere from .25-1% for children depending on their age). This is my article on using EOs for children safely. There is a lot of different opinions on using EOs for kids. Since I’m not a trained aromatherapist, I tend to take the safe route with it comes to EOs. Hope this helps answer your questions a bit!! PS. Just for the record, higher dilution rates are often used in bath products (body wash, shampoo, shave creams, etc.) as they don’t sit on the skin, but are washed off fairly quickly. This decreases the amount of EO absorption you would have, therefore, higher percentages of EOs can go in those products so they smell stronger.

LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.


When it comes to blending essential oils for aromatic purposes (that means you’re blending based on scent rather than a therapeutic action), it’s important to make sure you find essential oil combinations that go together or attract so they smell nice once they’re blended together. I personally find this to be important when blending essential oils for therapeutic purposes as well, but that’s just a personal preference.  
Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).

Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.

Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂


During the day I use my Lampe Bergers…and buying their fuel has become an expense I feel is impractical. So, I’ve been trying to make some myself, using 91% isopropyl alcohol and a blend of essential oils. I really haven’t had any problems, other than the scents I’ve made are just not very strong. Could it be that my oils are not good enough for this purpose? I’ve done some testing of different brands by putting just a drop of oil onto a piece of paper and allowing it to dry. The Majestic Pure dries almost completely, without leaving much of a mark on the paper, while other brands dry leaving an oily mark. Is it possible that the Majestic Pure has alcohol in it?
I’m a big proponent of using natural, mind-body therapies to create better sleep, both by helping sleep directly and by relieving stress, anxiety, low mood, and physical discomfort. The practice of aromatherapy can do all these things. Essential oils have been used for centuries to promote relaxation and mental and physical wellness. Today, these same oils are increasingly being studied by scientists in search of a more rigorous, specific understanding of their benefits to sleep and health.

Some of the recipes I’ve especially loved in this book have been the essential oil blends for anxiety. There’s several of them in the book, but these three have been my favorite. You can use them by inhaling them directly out of the bottle when needed, combining them with a carrier oil, like almond or fractionated coconut oil, and applying them directly to the skin, or diffusing them with an essential oil diffuser.
I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
Essential oils are concentrated aromatic liquids made from the roots, seeds, flowers, fruits and leaves of plants (source). They are easily vapourised to release a strong, pleasant odour. They are called “essential” oils as they contain the plant’s “essence”, i.e. chemical compounds present in the plant that may have health benefits. (source)Essential oils have been used for thousands years in Egypt, Greece, China, India and the Roman Empire as part of ceremonies, primitive cosmetics and medicinal remedies. (source)
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
Information and statements about the products on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.
×