Okay, so I am clearly late to the game on this post, but I am so glad I found it! Jill, I have been researching essential oils, diffusers, oil blends, etc. – and my gosh!, there is a lot of information out there. It is overwhelming. Thank you for this very helpful, easy to follow post on using essential oils in a diffuser. I signed up to receive your emails and got your book for FREE. Thank you! My family of four has been so sick this past month. My friends keep telling me that I need to be using essential oils. Your blog is fantastic. I know I will be coming back to visit often. Blessings, Jana
Another thing I learned was about the whole “therapeutic” thing. I always thought that when an oil company claimed that their oil was “therapeutic grade” it meant that it could be used medicinal purposes, not just for aromatherapy purposes. I’m sure that’s true, but from what you, the article I just read, and other EO experts are saying, that isn’t true. Pure essential oils can be used for their “therapeutic” or medicinal qualities just like they can be used in aromatherapy. The term “therapeutic grade” means nothing. Eden’s Organic oils say 100% Pure Essential Oils on their bottles, but I think somewhere on their site it says therapeutic grade. I’m assuming many small companies like theirs are having to claim this in order to keep up with the bigger companies, whether it’s true or not. Either way, it doesn’t matter to me, but I did take that wording out of this post so that it’s more accurate!

In fact, the benefits of diffusing essential oils into the air are one of the main reasons I’m loving these essential oil recipes. When you apply heat to essential oils, many studies show it can actually denature many of the most important chemicals and compounds, so you are essentially just diffusing the oils for scent, and not for the beneficial aspects.
Hey! Sorry to be commenting on such an old post, I was googling and found you. =) You have a lot of helpful information posted, I really appreciate it! I am a nursing student and I’ve just started to use essential oils for studying and test taxing anxiety. I am using lavender and rosemary because I’ve read a lot of research on these and they seem to be scientifically proven to help with testing. I also have ADHD and of course like all nursing students, a ton of test taking anxiety. I am wondering if I could combine the two oils to help me with my exams? If so what would your ratio recommendation be? The rosemary alone seems to help me concentrate a lot (probably as much as my adderall) but I feel more anxious when using it (also like when I take my adderall). The lavender alone makes me so relaxed I’m a little on the fuzzy side. I have done both of these with the diffuser and applying topically with fractioned coconut oil. When I apply topically I make a rollerball with 10mL of fractioned coconut oil and 20 drops of essential oil. Any advice or tips you can give would be greatly appreciated!
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srrryy i forgot to tell that im talkin about essential oils and im using three oils for this purpose lavender bcoz of its good soothing frangrance and as well as mosquito repellent property and the other two are eucalyptus essential oil and clove oil which has great mosquito repellent need your help how to mix it and use it. it may be chances that after mixing these oils only aroma will come and the other property of mpsquito repellent will not work or may be aftr mixing aroma can be effectd so which mixing of which oil give optimum performance i need help about it give your suggestion plzzzz

I know I’ve said it quite a few times already, but when it comes to blending essential oils there is no “one right way” to do it. The same is true when it comes to essential oil blending ratios. Like most essential oil blending concepts, it comes down to what you like. With that said, I’m going to share a few of the simplest blending ratios I’ve personally used to help give you a place to start.
Hey, Rachel. It looks like you may have too many top note EOs in your blend which is why you’re not getting that long-lasting scent from it. Rosemary is the only oil you listed that is a middle note, but it’s also considered a bit of a top note too. In all the blending formulas, the middle notes make up the largest portion of your blend with top notes coming in second and base notes coming in last as they mainly ground or stabalize your blend. If I were you, I would go through the process again, adding in more middle note oils and maybe taking out some top note oils. Or, you could always find some middle note oils that fit with the purpose of your blend and blend well with the oils you’re already using. In that case, all you’d need to do would be to adjust the amounts of each oil in the final blend (using the suggested formulas) so that your middle note oils make up the largest portion of the blend. Hope that helps! PS… There are also some essential oils that stimulate nerves that allow you to smell them once and then you can no longer smell them until the nerves are destimulated. I can’t remember which exact EOs that do that, but I read about it from an aromatherapist a while back. I’ve not looked into it much, but I thought that was interesting.
Our sense of smell is directly wired to the brain’s centers of memory and emotion. Cells inside the nose detect smells in our environment, and send information to the brain, via the olfactory nerve. (We also have a cluster of cells the top of the throat that detect scents from the food we consume, and pass that information along the same olfactory channel to the brain.) The information about smell does immediately to the limbic system of the brain, which includes regions like the amygdala that control emotional reactions and memory.  
So again, I don’t know how to figure out the ratios except that the first ingredient is supposed to be the largest and they work their way down to less and less. You definitely could follow this as a guide and try blending small amounts of oil until you find a combination you like and seems to be effective on him. If it were me, I’d try to work through the process to come up with a good blend. I also have a post coming out in February that walks you through exactly how I blend oils. Maybe that will help you out some. Stay tuned, and thanks for your comment Tania!
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I’ve long been a candle addict. There’s nothing like lit candles, good music and the ambiance it creates for a relaxing evening at home. And while I haven’t completely kicked the candle habit to the curb, I’m being wiser about my choices for the more occasional lighting of only soy or beeswax while avoiding the paraffin (toxin releasing) candles.  But an even better option, which I pretty much use all day long while at home are our essential oil diffusers. Definitely a new kind of addiction. Another plus? It’s elicited more, “Wow, it smells great in here,” comments from guests than my mix of candles ever did!
It’s important to note: sandalwood has also been shown to increase wakefulness and alertness, even when it is also triggering physical relaxation. Everyone reacts to scents differently. Sandalwood may deliver sleep benefits for some people, while for others, it may promote wakeful, attentive relaxation. If that’s the case for you, sandalwood isn’t right for nighttime, but you can use it during the day to feel relaxed and alert.
Sure Dorie. So after you’ve got your essential oil blend, you can diffuse it at home to get it into the air or you can just open the bottle and sniff it from time to time. That’s two great ways to use EOs safely… assuming the oils are appropriate for your son’s age. For school, the best bet is to dilute the EO blend in a carrier oil (like jojoba oil) and put it in a 1 oz. glass bottle with a roller top. That way it’s easy to apply. Simply rub a little bit on the insides of the wrist, behind the ears, the temple area, or the neck and you should be able to absorb it into the skin slowly as well as smell it for a bit. Hope that helps!! Let me know if you have any other questions!
Organic Infusions, Inc is a farm direct, wholesale essential oil supplier committed to purity. During inhalation of an authentic certified organic or wildcrafted therapeutic grade essential oil, you are connecting to the very life force of the plant. The energetic vibration of the plant unites with the body harmonics within each of us. Organic Infusions understands that when aromatherapy essential oils are altered by artificial means, the precious essence of those oils is forever changed. For this reason Organic Infusions does not carry essential oils that have been diluted, altered, or synthetically modified.
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