I mentioned this earlier but it’s an important point so I’ll re-iterate – essential oils should be an adjunct to conventional treatment of anxiety and depression, not an alternative. Only in very mild cases should you try to treat your stress with essential oils alone. Healthcare professionals will be able to give you the best advice depending on your particular situation.
I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
I love, love, love your tapping scripts. Thank you soooo very much for your products. I am so excited to begin using them. 🙂 Also, I truly appreciate you for your love of helping people. It shows by the amount of free content you offer. I just wanted to acknowledge my appreciation and say again,Thank you. May God bless every employee and family member of your employees. You are ray of light in this world. Thank you!
Hi Cindy. The amount of oils to lotion will depend on what you’re using your lotion for and how often. If it’s an all-over body lotion that’s used a couple times a day you usually use a lower dilution (1-2%), but if it’s a lotion for bug bites or eczema and you’re only putting it on a small area of skin, you can use a higher dilution (3-5%). A 1% dilution is 1 drop of essential oil for every 1 teaspoon of product. Another way to look at it is 6 drops for every 1 ounce. Hope that helps!
I mentioned this earlier but it’s an important point so I’ll re-iterate – essential oils should be an adjunct to conventional treatment of anxiety and depression, not an alternative. Only in very mild cases should you try to treat your stress with essential oils alone. Healthcare professionals will be able to give you the best advice depending on your particular situation.
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*sigh* this EO thing is so overwhelming. I can’t find anything that says what to do once you’ve mixed an oil blend. Do you apply it to a specific part of the body? I am looking for blends that will focus and calm myself and 8 yr old son…Both for home and school/work. I am seeing several blends to try…but don’t know what to do with them when they’re created. Any help?

Hi Kristi! I wouldn’t necessarily run all at the same time with different blends as it could just be too much for your sense of smell, unless they are in different rooms and you won’t notice the scent from another room. I do have one in my bedroom and another in my kitchen area and almost always have different blends in them, although usually they aren’t running simultaneously since I’m not in both of the rooms at the same time. I also have one in the kids room where I’ll run some soothing blends in there for a little while before they go to sleep 🙂
Hey Gabriela! I can’t speak from experience here because I’ve never made my own candles, but I too have heard that essential oils don’t work as well as fragrance oils in candles. No matter, I’d personally use them over fragrance oils. As far as the jasmine absolute… I don’t think you will get the scent you’re going for if you use any essential oil that’s already diluted in a carrier oil like the jojoba oil in this case. You need the concentrated oil. And yes, I’d still think the 30-50-20 rule would still apply if you want a rounded blend. Hope that helps… some!
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I know I’ve said it quite a few times already, but when it comes to blending essential oils there is no “one right way” to do it. The same is true when it comes to essential oil blending ratios. Like most essential oil blending concepts, it comes down to what you like. With that said, I’m going to share a few of the simplest blending ratios I’ve personally used to help give you a place to start.
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Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!
I'm new to using essential oils and sensitive to strong smells so it took a while to figure out how much was enough for me and what was too much! The smell is great, kind of sweet and with a hint of spice. It is too strong for me if i use more than one drop but it has worked well for me and actually does help control my anxiety. I will definitely be using this long term and buying it again!

Hi Meagan, Thanks for sharing, you really broke the process down in an easy to understand way. Wish I had the oils you used in the example so I could try it out. I’m going to read more of your blog. I do have a question though, I think you said you’ve used Eden’s Garden and Young Living. I’ve been using Eden’s Garden for 2 years now and since I never tried anything else I am very satisfied, just needed an opinion from someone else to help me in my research. Today I went to a class and made YL Thieves Disinfectant spray. All the oils she let us smell seemed more fragrant than my EG EOs, I was wondering if you ever noticed that and what may be the reason. I’m not sure how oils are “supposed” to smell, only that I did notice a slight difference.


Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
There are many wonderful ways to experiment with your favorite stress and anxiety reducing essential oil blends. This natural plant medicine can be easily integrated into any lifestyle, making their use ideal for even the most hectic days. Many of the practices that involve the use of essential oils are themselves relaxing in nature, and their stress and anxiety-reducing effects are only strengthened by the incorporation of aromatherapy.
I am sorry if this is offending, but why does DoTerra price their oils so high? I will never buy from them because I have used them and they are the same quality as all the other brands not greedy for money. For example: I can buy 100% pure (and I have this to compared to other brands, still work the best) Frankincense oil for about $14 for 4oz. But if I got DoTerra, that would cost me a hefty $558 wholesale. DoTerra retail for that would be even more, $744. That is 53x the price of the same quality oil I get. So is DoTerra really 53x better that what I get?
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?
This is so perfect. I have been studying so much on herbs and oils. I make my own herbal tea blends that I sell. I just finished mixing the oils for a calming aromatherapy oil. I used a 1oz bottle. I kind of go big or go home… And this is my first go at it. It has lavender, majorim, orange sweet, and sandlewood. They are “resting” now. I like to use oil like this before bed. So I decided to try my own mixture with what I have learned and my favorite and most soothing smells. I will then mix the rest with my carrier oil and have my first ounce of a blend. But it’s just for me. If it turns out well… I may make roll on scents to sell in my shop!
I really enjoy Lea’s website too! One thing I recently learned about the 3rd party testing she had done though, was it may not be very reliable. She chose a chemist in France who used outdated testing equipment simply because it was the cheapest. And although I greatly appreciate her knowledge, she gets very defensive and on the verge of rude at times in the comments. I also know she doesn’t appreciate learning that isn’t taught by a certified aroma therapist.

Oils can also be dropped onto your pillow to promote better sleep, or they can be added to water in a spray bottle and misted onto blankets, area rugs, curtains, and household surfaces. The meditative practice of steam inhalation can also be beneficial in eliminating anxiety; simply add a few drops of your favorite blend to a bowl of hot water, hold your face over the bowl, and drape a moistened cloth over the back of your head. Breathe in and out steadily and slowly.


Multipurpose Essential Oil: The aromatherapy oil blend can be utilized as a calming cologne, car freshener, bath salts, to make candles, etc. You can even make your very own deodorant by blending 2 to 3 drops in your regular perfume. You can also calm your pets while driving to the vet, flying to vacation, or simply when they’re anxious at home by applying a few drops on their paws.
Another thing I learned was about the whole “therapeutic” thing. I always thought that when an oil company claimed that their oil was “therapeutic grade” it meant that it could be used medicinal purposes, not just for aromatherapy purposes. I’m sure that’s true, but from what you, the article I just read, and other EO experts are saying, that isn’t true. Pure essential oils can be used for their “therapeutic” or medicinal qualities just like they can be used in aromatherapy. The term “therapeutic grade” means nothing. Eden’s Organic oils say 100% Pure Essential Oils on their bottles, but I think somewhere on their site it says therapeutic grade. I’m assuming many small companies like theirs are having to claim this in order to keep up with the bigger companies, whether it’s true or not. Either way, it doesn’t matter to me, but I did take that wording out of this post so that it’s more accurate!

When it comes to blending essential oils for aromatic purposes (that means you’re blending based on scent rather than a therapeutic action), it’s important to make sure you find essential oil combinations that go together or attract so they smell nice once they’re blended together. I personally find this to be important when blending essential oils for therapeutic purposes as well, but that’s just a personal preference.  
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