Glad to hear you’re finding the info helpful. I’ve never heard of the Majestic Pure brand before so I can’t comment on how strong it is. I always look for EOs from brands I know and trust that are high-quality, pure oils. If you can’t smell your blend well once it’s added to your alcohol, it could be that your dilution rate is off. I’m not sure. If you’re looking for a good company with a lot of oil choices, be sure to check out Edens Garden essential oils. They offer pure EOs, and they carry a ton of scents!
I hear you Jill… I did the same thing except I used other oils that were more fragrant so I had to use WAY more essential oils than I originally thought I would. Now, this was my first sugar scrub too so I’m not an expert. In fact, I’d rather direct you to my friend Stacy over at A Delightful Home as she’s written an ebook all about making scrubs as gifts so she knows way more about that than I do. As far as the smell being off… I let my scrubs set a bit and then they smelled better and everyone who received them loved them. Also, you could try adding in more sugar to see if it cuts the smell a little. I’d wait on adding more coconut oil because that can get your scrub to oily. Anyway, sorry I couldn’t be of more help. Definitely check out Stacy’s blog.

Thank you so much for this info it’s been so valuable to me and finding out you are a sister in Christ is the icing on the cake :-). I’ve been trying to find/make a beard oil that’s quite sweet but manly at the same time. I love cinnamon but I am finding it quite powerful and it overwhelming. I’ve waste carrier oils because I’ve been mixing essential oils in them trying to get a smell rather than mixing them first then adding them. My wife tells me when it’s nice or overpowering (usually is) so I’m going to put into practice everything you’ve written here. After I’ve made a nice cinnamon base oil I’m moving on to one that has a nice thistle/ heather smell to remind me of hill walking in the scottish highlands.
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I’ve learned a very important lesson recently. A friend who sells young living told me that I could put a few drops of lemon oil in my water, as well as orange and grapefruit. Dummy me didn’t research this. You know, “well she’s a friend and seems to know a lot about oils. I can trust what she says”. One night I couldn’t sleep well, even had my lavender in my diffuser. I kept wondering “what the hheeeecckkk”. Prayed a bit, and then listened and read up on grapefruit oil. Wellllll that was my first lesson DO NOT TAKE OILS INTERNALLY and grapefruit oil is an energizer.
Personally (I use less than most) I do one of lavender, one of orange…. But it’s for my 2 yr old daughter’s room at night. Most people (from reading/talking to people) use between 5-10 drops in theirs. For even me, I find that amount overwhelmingly strong. You can use one oil, or a blend of your own making. I’m newer to oils as well, so I haven’t tried too many, but if you don’t like a scent you need to use just do one drop, and two+ of a more pleasing scent. You can use them all, or just one it’s really up to you.
I am sorry if this is offending, but why does DoTerra price their oils so high? I will never buy from them because I have used them and they are the same quality as all the other brands not greedy for money. For example: I can buy 100% pure (and I have this to compared to other brands, still work the best) Frankincense oil for about $14 for 4oz. But if I got DoTerra, that would cost me a hefty $558 wholesale. DoTerra retail for that would be even more, $744. That is 53x the price of the same quality oil I get. So is DoTerra really 53x better that what I get?
To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.
Once you’ve got your base and middle note oils smelling the way you want them, you’ll add in one drop of your top note oil, swirl and smell your blend again, and see what you think. From there, you keep adding oils one drop at a time until you get the a scent you like. Like I said, this blending ratio is a mix between beginner and intermediate blending because you’re only working with three essential oils, but you’re relying on your senses and intuition to guide you.
When creating essential oil blends, the ratio I almost always follow is what I call the “30-50-20 Rule.” This is an essential oil blending ratio where you use 30% of your top note oil, 50% of your middle note oil, and 20% of your base note oil in your blend. This blending ratio consists of 10 total drops of essential oils, totaling 100% once combined.
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
Many essential oils can be ingested by the mouth; however, it is critical to make sure that the oils you use are safe and pure. Many oils on the market may be diluted or blended with synthetics that are unsafe for ingesting. The Food and Drug Administration has approved some essential oils generically for internal use and given them the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) designation for human consumption. (15)

In fact, the benefits of diffusing essential oils into the air are one of the main reasons I’m loving these essential oil recipes. When you apply heat to essential oils, many studies show it can actually denature many of the most important chemicals and compounds, so you are essentially just diffusing the oils for scent, and not for the beneficial aspects.

HELP I’m actually planning on making some home heat pads with jasmine rice. My plan was to use dried lavender and rosemary. I saw oils and a fixative would help the scent last in the herbs. So, making a “perfume blend” with lavender as my strongest scent, then rosemary, and oakmoss absolute as my fixative. I was going to put the rosemary and lavender buds in separate bowls with the majority of the rice in the lavender but a smaller portion set with the rosemary…then add a few drops of the essential oils to the separate bowls (rosemary probably 4-6) (lavender 8-12). After they’ve dried I’d like to combine everything and add my oak moss absolute … I want 2-3 drops I just have no idea how to help that spread TBH but this IS my plan-really hoping if you have any advice or experience about my plans to please share before I ruin everything lol THANK YOU!
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Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
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Hi, Dorothy. Great question, and this may be something you’ll want to run by an aromatherapist as they have more training in how EOs are made. But, from my understanding, whether the essential oil is extracted via steam (water), alcohol, or CO2… none of that comes through in the final product. As in, you don’t actually have water or alcohol or CO2 in the final essential oil. So, when you’re blending, you’re actually blending oil with oil regardless of the extraction process and emulsifiers aren’t needed. Now, I could be totally wrong there. Again, you’ll need to ask someone more knowledgeable in that area. Hope this helps.

Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.
Anyway… thank you for this post! I have been interested in making custom blends but I know enough about oils to understand mixing them changes the compounds and effects of the constituents, and the order in which they are mixed will influence the properties, too. But I don’t know anything beyond that such as what to combine and how to go about blending. This is a great and easy to understand introduction. Thank you! And if you have a link to the article you mention having read on the topic of quality and labels, Meagan, I’d love to read it, too!
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!
I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!

Hi, Jesslyn. Essential oils do have shelf-lives as do base oils (also known as carrier oils). The shelf-life will vary based on each oil so you’ll want to research each oil in your DIY blend to find that information as well as any carrier oil you add your EO blend into. When stored properly, most EOs and EO blends diluted in carrier oils will last 1-2 years. Hope that helps!
The beauty of essential oils is that they are natural, extracted from flowers, leaves, bark or roots of plants. While it’s best to make sure you use pure essential oils, meaning oils that have not been diluted with chemicals or additives, they can provide much needed relief and healing for a variety of ailments, including as a natural remedy for anxiety.
I have been reading your blog now for a few months and I really respect your advice and ideas. I also signed up for your “better listening” email series and have been learning a ton and working on implementing your advice with my 21 month & 3 1/2 year olds. They are responding well and I am looking particularly forward to working through these strategies with my youngest. He is as sharp as a tack and just coming into his own now. These tools are great and it’s awesome to have been equipped with  them right as he’s coming into the defiance stage. I feel much more confident in my ability to manage the challenges of this stage now. Thank you!
A study used a blend of bergamot with lavender essential oils to help treat anxiety and depression. The blend was applied to the skin of the abdomen. Various different parameters were recorded – blood pressure, pulse rate, breathing rate and skin temperature. Participants were also required to rate their emotional condition in terms of relaxation, vigor, calmness, attentiveness, mood and alertness.
Middle notes are like the “ties that bind” only they are binding your other essential oils together into a harmonized blend. These are the oils that complete your blend by balancing the light top notes with the deep base notes. The aroma of middle notes lasts longer than those of top notes, but not as long as base notes. These oils can vary in consistency and are often derived from whole herbs and spices.
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