I started my journey with essential oils about 2 years ago after the birth of my first child. To say that they changed my life forever would be an understatement. I have created a book called "The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Essential Oils" that will teach you about some of the amazing benefits and uses that essential oils can provide in your home. Click here to get the FREE book.
Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
On your comment about learning from other certified aromatherapists… I’d agree with you there, but most of us are that way too. If we’re gonna trust people, we wanna see that people have credentials or at least a lot of experience. We go to doctors because they have the title MD… we don’t go to our friend down the road that got her medical knowledge by reading medical textbooks only. Same reason applies to why we hire lawyers, licensed plumbers and electricians, or pay alternative therapists with certificates showing they complete some sort of schooling. It’s a way to see that there’s knowledge and practice there. I think her big beef is with big EO company distributors that are giving unsafe advice as if they have tons of experience. I do know that she’s supportive of bloggers sharing safe EO information because she’s been kind about what I’ve shared here on this blog as well as some other blogs.
One of the things I did for my kids when they were younger and had a hard time going to sleep was put one to two drops of either chamomile or lavender eo in the palm of my hands, rub them together, then rub them all over the kids pillowcase and sheets. It worked like magic! The oils would wear off through the night and by morning the kids were refreshed and in a great mood.
From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.
This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.

CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.

I’m not sure what you’re asking me, Helen. Are you looking for a dilution chart that shows how many drops of preblended essential oils to put in a carrier oil? Lea over at Learning About EOs has a whole post on this, but keep in mind that dilution rates vary based on who the oil is for and what it’s for. Her post should answer your questions though.
When the scent of an essential oil is inhaled, molecules enter the nasal cavities and stimulate a firing of mental response in the limbic system of the brain. These stimulants regulate stress or calming responses, such as heart rate, breathing patterns, production of hormones and blood pressure. Aromatherapy can be obtained by using it in a bath, as direct inhalations, hot water vapor, vaporizer or humidifier, fan, vent, perfume, cologne, or — one of my favorites — through aromatherapy diffusers.
I recently took a class at my university on the use of essential oils and my professor mentioned that in rare cases peppermint can be extremely dangerous in children under 6. I believe Amplatz Children’s Hospital in Minnesota uses spearmint rather than peppermint as it produces similar effects. Please follow the link bleow for more information about this under the Special Considerations section. If you also find this information concerning I would suggest removing peppermint from your children’s top ten list.
All information contained within this site is for reference purposes only and are not intended to substitute the advice given by a pharmacist, physician, or any other licensed health-care professional. Organic Infusions products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any health condition or disease.
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